10 March Tibet Uprising Day 2019

60th Anniversary Timeline

1950
October 1, 1950

1949/1950 Chinese invasion

1949/1950 Chinese invasion

40,000 Chinese troops invaded Tibet; an independent nation the size of Western Europe.

1951
May 23, 1951

23 May 1951 17-point agreement

23 May 1951 17-point agreement

China consolidated its military occupation of Tibet forcing the Tibetan government to sign the ’17 Point Agreement’.

1959
March 10, 1959

10 March 1959 Tibetan national uprising

10 March 1959 Tibetan national uprising

Tens of thousands of Tibetans took to the streets of Lhasa, Tibet’s capital, rising up against China’s illegal invasion and occupation of their homeland.

March 12, 1959

12 March 1959 Tibetan Women’s Uprising

12 March 1959 Tibetan Women’s Uprising

15,000 unarmed Tibetan women came together and rose up against the forced occupation of Tibet by the communist Chinese government.

March 30, 1959

30 March 1959

30 March 1959

The Dalai Lama and his escape party crossed the border into India.

April 1, 1959

1959 to 1965 The UN General Assembly

1959 to 1965 The UN General Assembly

Three resolutions raising grave concern at the suppression of fundamental human rights in Tibet were passed by the UN.

1960
January 1, 1960

1960 – 1962 Famine and destruction

1960 – 1962 Famine and destruction

China’s ‘Great Leap Forward’ led to the deaths of hundreds of thousands of Tibetans.

1966
January 1, 1966

1966 – 1976 The Cultural Revolution

1966 – 1976 The Cultural Revolution

Chairman Mao’s communism campaign led to the destruction of 6,000 Tibetan Buddhist monasteries and cultural sites.

1987
September 21, 1987

21 September 1987 Five Point Peace Plan

21 September 1987 Five Point Peace Plan

The Dalai Lama presented his ‘Five Point Peace Plan’ as a solution to the situation; China flatly rejected his proposals.

September 23, 1987

September and October 1987

September and October 1987

In response to China’s rejection of the Dalai Lama’s ‘Peace Plan’, large protests broke out in Lhasa.

1988
March 1, 1988

March 1988

March 1988

Protests took place in Lhasa; Tibetan sources say up to 30 Tibetans were killed.

September 1, 1988

September 1988

September 1988

Nine monks from Drepung Monastery staged a protest in the centre of Lhasa Barkhor

December 1, 1988

10 December 1988

10 December 1988

A well-planned protest erupted in Lhasa. Chinese police opened fire on protesters, including foreigners, and Dutch national Christa Meindersma who was shot in the shoulder.

PHOTO – Tibet Watch

1989
March 10, 1989

1989 Tibetan Uprising

1989 Tibetan Uprising

Widespread protests broke out in Lhasa with tens of thousands of Tibetans taking to the streets. Chinese used brutal force to quell the protests, expelling all foreigners and declaring martial law.

December 10, 1989

10 December 1989

10 December 1989

The Dalai Lama was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

1995
January 1, 1995

1995

1995

Six year old Gedhun Choekyi Nyima was recognised as the reincarnation of the 10th Panchen Lama. He was kidnapped by Chinese authorities becoming the world’s youngest political prisoner. He remains missing today.

1996
January 1, 1996

1996

1996

Religious repression across Tibet intensified and China launched a brutal patriotic re-education campaign.

2001
January 1, 2001

2001

2001

China was awarded the 2008 Summer Olympics

2007
October 1, 2007

October 2007

October 2007

The Dalai Lama received the US Congressional Gold Medal. As Tibetans celebrated the award, China marshalled troops in a show of force

2008
March 10, 2008

March – June 2008

March – June 2008

Tibetan Uprising – Protests broke out in Lhasa and rippled across Tibet. Hundreds of Tibetans were killed and over 2,000 arrested.

August 1, 2008

August 2008

August 2008

China hosted the 2008 Summer Olympic Games in Beijing. Pro-Tibetan protests took place around the globe including in Beijing.

2009
February 1, 2009

2009 – 2018

2009 – 2018

In February 2009 a young monk named Tapey set fire to himself in Ngaba, eastern Tibet.

Over the next 9 years, more than 150 Tibetans in Tibet self-immolated, protesting China’s rule in Tibet, the majority dying as a result.

2019
March 10, 2019

New forms of protest

New forms of protest

Large protests continue sporadically across Tibet but Tibetans have sought new ways to defend their identity and basic rights; environmental protection, student protests, cultural resistance with music, poems and writings celebrating Tibet’s culture and nationhood.

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